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Film Noir and Neo Noir on TV: February 2015

*All times are PST. Please check the Turner Classics Movie website to confirm dates and times or additional programming information.

Turner Classic Movie Channel

Monday, February 2, 8:30 AM

HUMORESQUE (1946): Noirish romance about an equally talented and narcissistic classical musician (John Garfield) from the New York slums who falls in love with wealthy neurotic (Joan Crawford) with expectedly problematic results. Crawford's performance as a self-destructive alcoholic raises the level of the film beyond its melodramatic script. Dir. Jean Negulesco

Tuesday, February 3, 7:45 AM

THE FALLEN SPARROW (1943): A Spanish Civil War veteran (John Garfield) journeys to New York to investigate the death of his policeman friend. He suspects the suicide is in fact a murder. Nazis, as well as a beautiful woman (Maureen O'Hara), complicate his search for the truth. Based on the novel by pulp great Dorothy B. Hughes who also wrote the novels In a Lonely Place (1947) and Ride the Pink Horse (1946). Dir. Richard Wallace

Tuesday, February 3, 12:15 PM—5:00 PM

Spies à la Hitchcock
Double Feature

12:15 PM

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT (1940): An American reporter (Joel McCrea) covering the war in Europe gets mixed up in the assassination of a Dutch diplomat which leads to his uncovering a political conspiracy with the aid of the daughter (Laraine Day) of a prominent politician (Herbert Marshall) and a chap named ffolliott "with two small 'f's" (George Sanders), his rival for the girl's affection. This tremendously entertaining film features several vintage Hitchcock set pieces. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

2:30 PM

NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959): Foreign agents mistake suave and swinging advertising man Roger Thornhill (Cary Grant) for a spy. He takes it on the lam and encounters a beautiful blonde (Eva Marie Saint) who may or may not be trusted. This film earned 3 Oscar nominations: Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Color; Best Writing, Story and Screenplay - Written Directly for the Screen; and Best Film Editing Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Tuesday, February 3, 9:45 PM

THE THIN MAN (1934): Dashiell Hammett's urbane but fun loving sleuths Nick and Nora Charles, along with their pup Asta, investigate the disappearance of an inventor in this classic blend of laughs and suspense. Shot in just two weeks by director Woody "One-Shot'' Van Dyke and cinematographer James Wong Howe, this gem set the gold standard for the sophisticated comedy—inspiring five sequels as well as countless inferior imitations. Van Dyke previously directed Myra Loy and William Powell in Manhattan Melodrama and spotted the terrific chemistry of their off screen banter between takes. He insisted on casting the pair as Hammett's hard-drinking super-couple and the glamorous pair became one of the movies' great romantic teams. Dir. Woody Van Dyke

Thursday, February 5, 2:45 PM

PETE KELLY'S BLUES (1955): Ex-doughboy turned jazz musician Pet Kelly (Jack Webb) leads a quartet playing at a Kansas City speakeasy during the Roaring 20s. The quartet gets crossed up with a gangster (Edmond O'Brien) and his alcoholic girlfriend (Peggy Lee). Cynical Kelly finds that he has to take a stand. Ella Fitzgerald makes a memorable cameo as singer Maggie Jacks. Look for Jayne Mansfield as a cigarette girl. Dir. Jack Webb

Sunday, February 8, 9:00 PM

GASLIGHT (1944): A newlywed (Ingrid Bergman) fears she's going mad when strange things start happening at the family mansion where her aunt was murdered ten years earlier. Joseph Cotten stars as the handsome stranger who aids her. Charles Boyer stars as the handsome husband who terrorizes her. Dir. George Cukor

Monday, February 9, 10:00 PM—2:00 AM

Oscar Winning Noir

10:00 PM

LAURA (1944): In this film noir based on the Vera Caspary novel, dedicated detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews) investigates the death of the beautiful Laura (Gene Tierney), brutally gunned down at the door of her flat. As he interviews her friends and lovers, a complicated portrait of her emerges and he finds himself falling for the deceased girl. Clifton Webb and Vincent Price give outstanding performances as two bickering rivals for Laura's affections. Joseph LaShelle won the Oscar for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White for his work on the film. Dir. Otto Preminger

12:00 AM

MILDRED PIERCE (1945): Joan Crawford won an Oscar for her performance as a woman who builds herself up from grass widow to successful restaurateur in a desperate effort to win the love of the most ungrateful brat in the history of cinema, her daughter Veda, brilliantly played by Ann Blyth. Based on the James M. Cain story. Dir. Michael Curtiz

Tuesday, February 10, 4:00 AM—3:00 PM

Oscar Film Noir Marathon

4:00 AM

JULIE (1956): Doris Day crosses over to the dark side, in this ultimate example of the "woman-in-peril" film. Shot on-location in Carmel and San Francisco, it literally takes the "husband from hell" premise to new heights in an off-the-charts climax that finds stewardess Day fighting for her life aboard a soaring airliner. Implausibility is steamrolled with berserk gusto, leaving the audience helplessly entertained. Louis Jordan plays Julie's dangerous spouse. Barry Sullivan co-stars.

6:00 AM

CROSSFIRE (1947): In this seminal noir, an upright district attorney (Robert Young) investigates a seemingly motiveless murder. As he digs further the prime suspect (George Cooper) seems less and less likely to have done it and an ugly motivation begins to appear. Robert Mitchum and Robert Ryan play a couple of GIs caught up in the case, one trying to clear the suspect and the other trying to frame him. Gloria Grahame earned a best supporting actress nomination for her role as an embittered taxi dancer. Dir. Edward Dmytryk

7:30 AM

SUSPICION (1941): A handsome gambler Johnny Aysgarth (Cary Grant) pursues the shy and wealthy Lina McLaidlaw (Joan Fontaine). He courts and marries her. After the honeymoon she discovers unsettling things about his character. She becomes increasingly suspicious of him when Johnny's friend and business partner, Beaky (Nigel Bruce) dies mysteriously. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

9:30 AM

MYSTERY STREET (1950): A Cape Cod coroner (Ricardo Montalban) and a Harvard criminal pathologist (Bruce Bennett) try to solve a possible murder with nothing but the victim's bones to go on. Elsa Lanchester steals the show as the victim's shady landlady. Dir. John Sturges

11:15 AM

THE FALLEN IDOL (1948): This brilliant film, adapted by Graham Greene form his own story, centers on a wealthy but neglected child (Bobby Henrey) who thinks the servant (Ralph Richardson) he idolizes has committed murder. This film succeeds both as a suspense story and as an insightful drama where a child must navigate an often morally ambiguous and potentially dangerous adult world. Director Carol Reed and screenwriter Graham Greene both earned Oscar nods for the film. Dir. Carol Reed

1:00 PM

AFTER THE THIN MAN (1936): In this delightful follow up to The Thin Man, Nick (William Powell) and Nora (Myrna Loy) return to their home in San Francisco determined to rest up from their previous New York adventures, but Nora's snooty family unintentionally embroils them in a murder mystery. Joseph Calleia, Sam Levene, George Zucco and a young Jimmy Stewart add to the fun. Dir. W. S. Van Dyke

Tuesday, February 10, 7:15 PM

THE KILLERS (1946): Expanded from the Hemmingway short story, two professional killers come to a small town looking for The Swede (Burt Lancaster). An insurance investigator (Edmond O'Brien) unravels the tangled skein of events that led up to the hit. Ava Gardner plays Kitty, the woman who led the Swede to his doom. Dir. Robert Siodmak

Thursday, February 12, 6:30 PM

THE THIRD MAN (1949): This fantastic film about a naive American, Joseph Cotten, investigating the death of his friend, Orson Welles, in post-World War II Vienna never loses its impact no matter how many times you watch it. "Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and

Friday, February 13, 8:00 AM—3:00 PM

Oscar Nominated Suspense

8:00 AM

THE BAD SEED (1956): "What will you give me for a basket of kisses?" Based on the stage play adapted from the brilliant novel by William March, Army wife Christine (Nancy Kelly) suspects that her seemingly perfect little girl Rhoda (Patty McCormack) is a ruthless killer. Eileen Heckart shines in her Oscar nominated supporting role as the alcoholic mother of one of Rhoda's victims. This truly terrifying film will make you look twice at all cute little blonde girls. Kelly and McCormack as well as cinematographer Harold Rosson were nominated for Oscars as well as Heckart. Dir. Mervyn LeRoy

10:15 AM

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? (1962) A crazed, aging star (Bette Davis) torments her sister (Joan Crawford) in a decaying Hollywood mansion. This beautiful Hollywood gothic noir features a duet of superbly fearless performances by two legendary actresses. Nominated for five Oscars, but only one win, Best Costume Design, Black-and-White for Norma Koch Dir. Robert Aldrich

12:45 PM

THE BIRDS (1963): Beautiful heiress Melanie (Tippi Hedren) takes a sudden fancy to a handsome architect Mitch (Rod Taylor) who lives in a remote Californian costal village with his overly affectionate mother (Jessica Tandy) and little sister. Creepily Melanie follows him there and pretends to be an old friend of his ex-girlfriend (Suzanne Pleshette).Even more creepily, after her arrival, the village is besieged by flocks of killer birds. Look for noir toughie Charles McGraw in a supporting role. Legendary animator turned special effects expert Ub Iwerks won the Oscar for Best Effects, Special Visual Effects for his work on the film. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Saturday, February 14, 5:45 PM

THE HARDER THEY FALL (1956): A cynical press agent (Humphrey Bogart) tempted by the money, goes to work as a PR flak for the corrupt manager of a naïve boxer. He then must decide between the dough and exposing the inhuman conditions rife in the boxing game. DP Burnett Guffey earned an Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White for his work on the film. Dir. Mark Robson

Sunday, February 15, 4:00 AM—5:00 PM

More Oscar Noir

4:00 AM

JOHNNY EAGER (1942): A handsome racketeer (Robert Taylor) seduces the D.A.'s daughter (Lana Turner) for revenge, but then falls in love with her. Edward Arnold plays the D.A. Sharp eyed viewers will recognize this as one of the films used in Carl Reiner's noir parody Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982). Dir. Mervyn LeRoy

6:00 AM

T-MEN (1948): Director Anthony Mann and cinematographer John Alton— king of chiaroscuro — pull out all the stops in relating the intensely exciting and shockingly brutal tale of U.S. Treasury agents, led by the redoubtable Dennis O'Keefe, going undercover to infiltrate a cadre of counterfeiters. Great character bits from Charles McGraw and Wallace Ford in a vivid script by crime scribe John C. Higgins. One of the most artfully arresting visual spectacles of the original film noir era! Dir. Anthony Mann

7:45 AM

THE NAKED CITY (1948): A step-by-step look at a murder investigation on the streets of New York. Barry Fitzgerald plays the compassionate cop on the trail of a murder in this groundbreaking police procedural. Watch for noir regular and radio's Sam Spade, Howard Duff as the murdered girl's sleazy boyfriend. Dir. Jules Dassin

9:30 AM

THE ASPHALT JUNGLE (1950): A hoodlum and ex-con (Sterling Hayden) hopes for one last big score that will enable him to go home to his farm in Kentucky. He falls in with a gang of small time crooks plotting an elaborate jewel heist. Of course, you can never go home again. A young Marilyn Monroe plays a small but juicy part. Dir. John Huston

11:30 AM

THE BLUE DAHLIA (1946): A newly returned veteran (Alan Ladd) fights to prove he didn't kill his cheating wife (Doris Dowling). His shell-shocked war buddy (William Bendix) and a new love interest (Veronica Lake) try to help him find the real culprit. Dir. George Marshall

1:15 PM

THE MALTESE FALCON (1941): How do I love this movie, let me count the ways… Arguably the first, and greatest, film noir, hard-boiled detective Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart) gets caught up in the deadly search for a priceless statue. Along the way he tangles with a murderous liar (Mary Astor), an effete thug (Peter Lorre) and a fat mastermind (Sydney Greenstreet). Director John Huston brilliantly adapted it from the Dashiell Hammett novel. Dir. John Huston

3:00 PM

KEY LARGO (1948): A returning veteran (Humphrey Bogart) tangles with a ruthless gangster (Edward G. Robinson) during a hurricane while falling for his dead war buddy's widow (Lauren Bacall). Claire Trevor steals the film with her Oscar winning performance as the gangster's alcoholic and emotionally abused girlfriend. Dir. John Huston

Sunday, February 15,10:00 PM

I WANT TO LIVE (1958): Susan Hayward deservedly won the Best Actress Oscar for her bravura performance as Barbara Grahame, a former prostitute and drug addict, executed for murder. Hayward perfectly captures a possibly innocent woman convicted more for her lifestyle than evidence. Dir. Robert Wise

Monday, February 16, 5:00 PM

ANATOMY OF A MURDER (1959): In this drily witty courtroom drama, based on real events, a small-town lawyer (James Stewart) more interested in fishing and playing the piano then practicing law gets the case of a lifetime when he defends a soldier (Ben Gazzara) accused of murdering the man who beat and raped his flirtatious wife (Lee Remick). Eve Arden once again does a lot with a small part as his long suffering secretary. Duke Ellington composed the jazz score. Dir. Otto Preminger

Tuesday, February 17, 10:45 AM—5:00 PM

Oscar Nominated Neo-Noir

10:45 AM

IN COLD BLOOD (1967) Bleak adaptation of Truman Capote's ground breaking true crime book. Two men (Robert Blake and Scott Wilson) brutally murder a small town Kansas family, thinking that ten thousand dollars is hidden in the house. They flee with the forty-three dollars they actually found and the FBI hunts them. Dir. Richard Brooks

1:15 PM

THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR (1968): A bored tycoon (Steve McQueen) turns to bank robbery and courts the insurance investigator (Faye Dunaway) assigned to bring him in. Hard to decide which of the leads is prettier. Dir. Norman Jewison

3:00 PM

BULLITT (1968): When mobsters kill the witness Frank Bullitt (Steve McQueen) was assigned to protect, he uses unorthodox methods to investigate the case. Beautiful San Francisco location work and a breathtaking car chase sequence add additional pleasure to watching this fine neo-noir. Dir. Peter Yates

Tuesday, February 17, 5:00 PM

PSYCHO (1960): Miriam Crane (Janet Leigh) impulsively embezzles $10,000 dollars from her employer and takes it on the lam. She checks into the Bates Motel, meets the queer but attractive Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), takes a shower and makes cinematic history. A detective (Martin Balsam), Miriam's sister (Vera Miles) and her boyfriend (John Gavin) all arrive to look for the missing Miriam. Long time Hitchcock collaborator Bernard Herrmann created the rightfully legendary score. The immensely talented old time radio actress Virginia Gregg provides the voice of Norman's mother Norma Bates. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Thursday, February 19, 9:30 AM

WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION (1958): A British lawyer (Charles Laughton) gets caught up in a couple's tangled marital affairs when he defends the husband for murder. Laughton's wife Elsa Lanchester plays the nurse trying to keep him on his diet and off the cigars and brandy. This first rate film features both one of Tyrone Power's and one of Marlene Dietrich's best performances Based on the play written by Agatha Christie, adapted from her own short story. Dir. Billy Wilder

Friday, February 20, 8:30 AM—2:15 PM

Prison Noir Double Feature

8:30 AM

WHITE HEAT (1949): "Top of the world, Ma!" A government agent (Edmond O'Brien) infiltrates a gang run by a mother-fixated psychotic (James Cagney) in a stand out performance. This film marks when the traditional Warner Brothers' interpretation of the gangster gave way to the more cynical and psychological film noir interpretation. Pointless trivia: Naked Gun 33 1/3 borrowed the plot. Dir. Raoul Walsh

10:30 AM

CAGED (1950): This film noir in women-in-prison clothing details the transformation of a young, naïve and pregnant widow (Elanor Parker) into a hardened convict. She learns the hard way how to survive in the big house from a sadistic prison guard (Hope Emerson) and the failure of a good hearted warden (Agnes Moorehead) to reform the prison. This is more than an exploitation flick, it's an intelligent social drama and raises the still prescient issue facing the American penal system, is it actually reforming first time offenders or just turning prisoners into career criminal? Dir. John Cromwell

Sunday, February 22, 1:00 AM

KLUTE (1971) Small town detective John Klute (Donald Sutherland) journeys to the Big Apple to search for a missing friend. He has only one lead: an obscene letter from the man to New York City prostitute Bree Daniels (Jane Fonda). He unravels both the mystery of the missing man and of the call girl. Fonda won a well-deserved Best Actress Oscar for her portrayal of the disturbed and disturbing Bree. Dir. Alan J. Pakula

Sunday, February 22, 10:00 PM

DOG DAY AFTERNOON (1975): In New York city, a bank robbery turns into a media circus when Sonny (Al Pacino) tries to steal enough money for his lover's (Chris Sarandon) sex change operation and takes the bank's employees hostage. The film earned five Oscar nominations, only Frank Pierson won the Oscar for Best Writing, Original Screenplay for the film, based on true events. Surprisingly co-star John Cazale was not nominated for his excellent performance as Sal, Sonny's partner in crime. Dir. Sidney Lumet

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Even More Oscar Film Noir

3:00 AM

THE WINDOW (1949): A young boy (Bobby Driscoll) with a penchant for telling tall tales overhears a murder while sleeping alone on a fire escape. Of course, no one believes him except the murderers (Paul Stewart and Ruth Roman) who ruthlessly hunt him down. This excellent adaptation of a Cornell Woolrich story will keep you on the edge of your seat. Dir. Ted Tetzlaff

4:15 AM

NIGHT MUST FALL (1937): Young and charming Danny (Robert Montgomery) worms his way into elderly and wealthy Mrs. Bramosn's (Dame May Whitty) household. Her sexually repressed niece (Rosalind Russell) suspects him of larceny and possibly a local murder while being strongly attracted to him. What's in that hatbox? Dir. Richard Thorpe

6:15 AM

KIND LADY (1951): In this period noir, Ethel Barrymore stars as a wealthy art collector who takes in a young painter and his ill wife. When another couple shows up, things get ugly and she finds herself held captive in her own home. Dir. John Sturges

7:45 AM

WAIT UNTIL DARK (1967): A commercial artist unknowingly brings a stash of heroin into his home. Bad guys trace the dope to him. They trick him into leaving the house, but, unfortunately, his blind wife (Audrey Hepburn) is there alone. Dir. Terence Young

9:45 AM

THE NARROW MARGIN (1952): In this seminal noir, a tough cop (Charles McGraw) meets his match when he has to guard a gangster's moll, (Marie Windsor) on a tense train ride. Can he keep her alive long enough for her to testify? Dir. Richard Fleischer

11:00 AM

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (1951): Childlike but charming psychopath Bruno (Robert Walker) suggests that he and Guy (Farley Granger), a tennis player with political ambitions, crisscross murders. Unfortunately, Guy realizes too late that Bruno wasn't joking. Guy's unwanted wife shows up murdered and he has no alibi. Screenplay by Raymond Chandler and Czenzi Ormonde, based on Patrica Highsmith's novel. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

12:45 PM

SHADOW OF A DOUBT (1943): A young girl, Teresa Wright, fears her favorite uncle may be a killer, Joseph Cotten in the best performance of his career. "Do you know the world is a foul sty? Do you know, if you rip off the fronts of houses, you'd find swine? The world's a hell. What does it matter what happens in it?" Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

John Garfield and Joan Crawfield in Humoresque screening February 2;

Maureen O'Hara and John Garfield in The Fallen Sparrow on February 3;

Alfred Hitchcock directs Herbert Marshall in Foreign Correspondent on February 3;

William Powell, Asta, and Myrna Loy together in The Thin Man on February 3;

Ella Fitzgerald on the set of Pete Kelley's Blues screening February 5;

Ingrid Bergman vis-a-vis Charles Boyer and Joseph Cotten in Gaslight on February 8;

Clifton Webb coming between Gene Tierney and Vincent Price in Preminger's noir-classic Laura on February 9;

Carol Reed directs Bobby Henrey on the set of The Fallen Idol screening February 10;

The hitmen inquiring at the diner in Siodmak's classic The Killers airing February 10;

Joseph Cotten confronts a wily Orson Welles in The Third Man on February 12;

Patty McCormack stars in The Bad Seed on February 13;

The Harder They Fall starring Humphrey Bogart on February 14;

Charles McGraw menaces Dennis O'Keefe in master cinematographer John Alton's T-Men on February 15;

Susan Hayward's Oscar-winning performance in I Want To Live screening February 15;

Lee Remick stars with James Stewart in Anatomy of a Murder on February 15;

Robert Blake and Scott Wilson in In Cold Bloodscreening February 17;

Alfred Hitchcock taking Mrs. Bates chair on the set of Psycho on February 17;

Tyrone Power, visitor Noel Coward, Dietrich, Charles Laughton, on the set of Witness for the Prosecution playing February 19;

Eleanor Parker unforgettable in Caged screening on February 20;

Jane Fonda's Oscar-winning performance along side of Donald Sutherland in Klute airing February 22;

Al Pacino and John Cazale in Sidney Lumet's Dog Day Afternoon screening February 22;

Joseph Cotten and Teresa Wright in one of Hitchcock's most resonant films, Shadow of a Doubt, airing February 28.

 

 

 

 

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